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Review: Taylor Swifts new album ’1989′
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Review: Taylor Swifts new album ’1989′

If you loved Taylor Swift’s first album you may not like her most recent album “1989.”

Seeing that T Swift started as a country singer and won multiple Grammys, it is safe to say that she will not be categorized as country any longer. Granted there is no dubstep involved, like her previous album that was still labeled country, but there are tons of synths and no banjos. In fact, on apple iTunes, every single album she has made is filed under country, but this one is filed under pop.

Some may say that T Swift is channeling her most recent inner pop music habits are influenced by Katy Perry, but at the same time, this has been a transition that has taken some time over the years from album to album.

However, didn’t an artist already do this 12 years ago? Yeah, and her name is Shania Twain. She released a double album of the same songs. One was filled with the pop versions and the other was filled with the country versions. Granted Tswift didn’t release two albums, but were just kind of over the whole “I can do both” parade.

Max Martin produced seven of these 13 songs, and his beats provide the Saturday-night-whatever soundtrack as Swift sings about the single life in the big old city she always dreamed about,” according to Rolling Stones magazine.

Some may say that every once in a while, a song’s instrumental opening will grab them, like the humid first few bars of “Wildest Dreams,” and then Swift starts singing and they wonder if this is what being in an unhappy marriage feels like. In fact the man who said that was Rich Juzwiak from Gawker.

When it comes to her lyrics though, you better believe that they are still going to be about relationships but with a twist.

“Swift breaks with the past, skirting victimhood and takedowns of maddening exes, critics and romantic competitors. Instead, there’s a newfound levity. Not only is Swift in on the joke; she also relishes it,” said Sam Lansky, reporter for Time magazine.

But I found myself catching how often words or sentences were repeated, therefore showing a small lack of creativity. For example, the first song on “1989” Welcome to New York consists of:

Welcome to New York

It’s been waiting for you

Welcome to New York

Welcome to New York

Welcome to New York

It’s been waiting for you

Welcome to New York

Welcome to New York

 

And “Out of the Wood” has the same style:

Are we out of the woods yet?

Are we out of the woods yet?

Are we out of the woods yet?

Are we out of the woods?

Are we in the clear yet?

Are we in the clear yet?

Are we in the clear yet?

In the clear yet?

Good

 

Same for “All you had to do was stay:”

 

All you had to do was stay

All you had to do was stay

All you had to do was stay

All you had to do was stay

 

I think you get the point.

 

 

About Lea Elgin

Broadcast major Lea Elgin has interned at the Game Show Network, the Big Ten Network, and Red Bull North America. She expects her career path to take her either in front of the camera as an entertainment reporter or behind the scenes as a producer.

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